Venue:  Athlone

Times: 9.30am  – 4.30pm

Delivered over 4 interactive workshops – QQI Certification available (Component Certificate Level 5 – Teamworking)

Date Workshop
Thursday 28th June Managing Self
Thursday 12th July Time Management and Decision Making
Thursday 13th September Effective Team Player
Thursday 4th October Effective Communication

Cost is €525 Members; €656 Non-Members per person, Galway Executive Skillnets Funding applied

To book your place, contact Network Manager Carl Blake at Galway Executive Skillnet: carl.blake@icegroup.ie phone:  086 236 0136

Participate in an engaging programme that focuses on the key skills for effective management. Each workshop incorporates practical approaches based on best practices. Participants will work through case studies and simulation exercises to understand how their approaches and responses impact on outcomes. Through the programme participants will learn and apply practical approaches to:

  • Understand how best to work with colleagues on an on-going basis
  • Commit to actions demonstrating their ability to assume greater responsibility
  • Learn how to ensure that they deliver on Objectives
  • Understand the attitudes, behaviours and disciplines required of great team players
  • Commit to personal behaviours to improve team’s cohesion performance and collective spirit

Each workshop is highly interactive using group discussions, individual reflection and group exercises to explore issues and develop identified management skills.

Target Audience: Strong individual contributors, team leaders and those with people management responsibilities who are looking to enhance their skills and contribution to the organisation.  Individuals who have enthusiasm and commitment and would greatly benefit from the application of practical business and people management skills to their work situation

Delivery: 4 full day workshops – QQI (formerly FETAC) certification is available to all participants

  • Understanding Management
  • Leading Teams
  • Understanding Self and Others
  • Time Management and Effective Delegation
  • Communicating for Performance & Conflict Management
  • Managing Change

Feedback from previous programs:

  • I realised it wasn’t just me, and got the confidence to try things, thank you very much, the group discussions of problems were a great help.
  • Not what I expected, I really enjoyed the programme and learned a lot.  I would definitely recommend it.
  • Will recommend my company should send more staff on this course
  • Great course, really relevant to work situation and how best to handle them
  • I hope I didn’t vent too much, it was great to get the opportunity to discuss issues and get  collective support on how to address them

Training Company Name and Website: LEAP http://www.leapleadership.ie/

Front Line Managers Programme

Venue:  Sligo Chamber Board Room, Sligo

Times: 9.30am  – 4.30pm

Delivered over 6 interactive full day workshops – QQI Certification available (Component Certificate Level 6 – Managing People)

Date Workshop
Tuesday 12th June Understanding Management
Tuesday 26th June Leading Teams
Tuesday 10th July Communicating for Performance + Managing Conflict
Tuesday, 11th September Understanding Self and Others
Tuesday 25th September Time Management and Delegation
Tuesday 9th October Managing Change

Cost is €1,000 per participant. This includes the Sligo Chamber Skillnet Funding support being applied.

QQI Level 6 certification is available at €127 per person

To book your place, contact Network Manager:  Mary Harty:  mary@sligochamber.ie or 071 916 1274

This programme is accredited by QQI Ireland (formerly FETAC) Component Certificate Level 6 “Managing People”

Target Audience: This programme is designed to support a combination of team leaders, supervisors and managers. It is of benefit to managers looking to enhance their skills further and looking for practical application of best management practices and how to successfully apply them consistently.

Participate in an engaging programme that focuses on the key skills for effective management. Each workshop incorporates practical approaches based on best practices. Participants will work through case studies and simulation exercises to understand how their approaches and responses impact on outcomes. Through this experience participants will determine the best approaches for managing people and options for addressing issues as they arise.

Each workshop is highly interactive using group discussions, individual reflection and group exercises to explore issues and develop identified management skills.

Feedback from previous programs:

  • The training is excellent – interaction strongly encouraged – I would recommend strongly
  • Will recommend my company should send more staff on this course
  • I thoroughly enjoyed the programme, it gave excellent insights into myself and my skills
  • Excellent content made for engaging and thought-provoking sessions, memorable tools and great group dynamics
  • Great course, really relevant to work situation and how best to handle them
  • Found course excellent with a wealth of information and knowledge passed. Would strongly recommend to anyone in or starting a team leader/management role

The Front Line Managers Programme has enabled participants to:

Re-enforce and apply the most effective people management skills to get the best from their team and to address issues promptly and effectively.

Training Company Name and Website: LEAP http://www.leapleadership.ie/

 

 

A common misconception is that lean is only suitable for manufacturing but have a look at the article below and see how lean can be applied in the creative world and professional services.

Lean – first of all, what is it?

The core philosophy of lean is the elimination of waste. While it is easy to identify physical waste the greater challenge in most organisations is to identify the waste of time and resources. Most organisations are extremely busy, fire-fighting and pressure to meet deadlines are a way of life. Lean provides a structured approach and tried and trusted methodologies to eliminating wasted effort in organisations. It goes beyond the sloganeering of “work smarter not harder” and shows people how to analyse the true value of their work and eliminate non-value added activities.

A popular misconception is that lean is suited only for manufacturing. Not true. Lean applies in every organisation and every process. It is not a tactic or a cost reduction program, but a way of thinking and acting for an entire organisation.

The starting point of any lean programme is Value Stream Mapping. This involves the people working in the process stepping back and mapping the process to identify the value and non-value activities they regularly engage with. From here several techniques are employed to get to the root cause of the non-value add activities. The result is an increase in the effectiveness of the individuals or team performance.

Lean is not a stand-alone programme but supports the implementation of policies and procedures in a meaningful way. It is a change management programme and as such will require the engagement of employees fully. Therefore, it is important that a lean initiative is not seen as the “flavour of the month” or something that is imposed by senior management. Key to success will be introducing a lean programme in such a way that employees see the benefits of the programme and that it is fully supported by the leadership of the organisation. All successful lean initiatives recognise that people are the key to success and as such LEAP are well equipped to support the people development element of the programme.

Examples of Lean in practice.

  A Design Studio

A design studio in a printing company kept five fully committed designers very busy. When we analysed how many hours of their working week was billed to customers (Value add work) we discovered that they were 52 efficient. The remaining 48 of their time was non-value added work. This was the time spent answering queries from production, requesting further information from clients, clarifying issues with the sales teams etc.

The first thing we did was create an “Interruptions Board” We assigned one of the five designers to deal with all interruptions. Each of the five were assigned one day per week as their day to deal with interruptions. On their assigned day, they would deal with the call or visitor and place their query on the board under the name of designer the query was directed towards. That designer would then deal with the query when he/she was taking a break or at the end of the day. This allowed four designers to work uninterrupted every day.

Following on from this, the designers could look at the nature of the interruptions and through using lean techniques were able to establish the root cause of the interruptions. Working together with production, clients and sales team they developed systems to reduce the non-value added activities.  The increase in value added activity in the studio increased from 52 to 83 within months and they continue to uses the methodology for continuous improvement.

 Accountancy Practice

When you visit an accounts office the “work” is invisible, in other words you see lots of people sitting at computer terminals. It is impossible to determine how effective the operation is or how efficient each individual is. There is no doubt that everyone is “busy”.

By undertaking Value Stream Mapping, we were able to see that most of the work that came into the office had incomplete paperwork, forms missing, items not attached etc. This meant that when employees started a job they were not in position to complete it. This necessitated making a phone call or emailing a client to request the full information. The job was set aside until the information was made available. They then started another job and the same thing happened. This resulted in a huge amount of Work In Progress. There was confusion as to the status of individual jobs, clients not returning information, forgetting to chase up etc. This kept everyone busy.

When we demonstrated this by graphing the workflows we then set about doing a root cause analysis to develop systems and processes to prevent incomplete jobs entering the system. We also created a visual system that could measure the improved efficiency of the department. It resulted in much better management of peak times in the business such as year-end accounts. There was less stress for the staff and the necessity to work late in the evenings disappeared.

Running your own business can be very rewarding…it can also be very frustrating for a number of reasons. Sometimes you feel you are running to stand still. Everyone is caught up in the day to day, fire firefighting and it can be difficult to see the woods from the trees.

You sometimes wish for the opportunity to stand back and critically look at what you are doing. You would love to challenge your team about what they are doing but you don’t know where to start. It is often said that “If you don’t know where you are going then any road will do”. Now it is time to plan, set objectives, assign responsibility and develop accountability in your business.

The Management Team Programme is a high impact programme for the owners and senior management teams in the S.M.E sector. The programme is heavily subsidized by the Department of Education and Skills. There are only 4 programmes left in their allocation and now is the time to sign up before the year ends.

What is the Management Team Programme?

The government received a McKinsey Report some years ago and it raised concerns that the management capability in the SME sector was beginning to fall behind our competitor countries. They responded by introducing a number of measures including the Management Team Programme.
This programme is designed specifically with the owners and senior management teams in small to medium businesses in mind. It is not theory or academic. It is practical and deals with the real issues in business. It is delivered by a team of people who have real experience in business and proven track record.

We have delivered a large number of programmes over the last number of years and some common themes have emerged.

1. I have yet to meet any company where people complain of having too little work. Yes, people are busy but are they busy on the right things? Firefighting becomes a way of life for some people, you get a buzz from it, you create local heroes! They say every good firefighter carries around their own box of matches. The Management Team programme addresses this issue head on.

2. The two things missing from most companies is Focus and Discipline. By this I mean that companies jump from one thing to the next. But through the programme you will discover what it is that you really need to focus on. Then you need the Discipline to follow through. The structure, the regular reviews and the Key Performance Indicators, these are some of the tools you need.

3. You may already have regular management meetings, targets, KPI’s etc. but are they the right ones, are they getting stale. If there is a lack of energy around these items, then it is time to freshen up.

4. You are listening to yourselves talk so much that you are no longer listening! Sometimes having the outsider come in and ask the obvious questions can be challenging. For example, one company was killing itself providing next day delivery to its customers. When I asked how many customers really need next day delivery there were very few. By changing to next day delivery by request the company freed up a huge amount of resources. Or for example which customers are your gold star customers? Which customers would you be better off without? These are challenging questions and I often meet resistance but unless the answers make sense to me then I will keep asking!

5. The organization or structure has remained the same for some time. It can be difficult to really ask yourself if your management structure is fit for purpose. Who is contributing, who could contribute more? If we were to restructure could we optimize performance by some fresh thinking? What about succession planning or people development?

These are some of the common themes or questions addressed by the programme. There are others, some specific to individual businesses. But fundamental to the programme is asking the right questions of your management team and some questions you may not have thought of. More importantly having the courage to answer these questions honestly and having the Focus and Discipline to see things through.

If you sometimes struggle to see the woods from the trees, then this programme is for you.

 

leadership, leadership ireland, executive coach John Raftery is Senior Partner and Executive Coach at LEAP

 

 

4 key questions every successful manager must be able to answer

Management effectiveness is ultimately about developing a strong team capable of delivering company objectives. There are two crucial components of a manager’s job – operational management and people management. In this article Tricia Cunningham outlines the people aspect of the role and what managers need to get right in order to be successful.

Tricia, what is management effectiveness in practice?
A great manager has two fey focuses. There is the technical or operational side of their role and there is the people side of their role. So for a great manager there are two components to the management role, with 4 elements within each component.

On the operational effectiveness side there are four key requirements:

Technical

1. Plan
2. Organise
3. Influence
4. Control

As Marcus Buckingham, prolific writer on best management practices points out, there are four key requirements on the people side that an effective manager needs to get right:

People

1. Select the right people for their team
2. Set and agree on expectations with the team members
3. Motivate the individual members
4. Develop people for long-term contribution to the organisation

Management effectiveness is about achieving results through optimum use of the resources available, the key resource being the people on the team. If you really want to be a great manager you need to pay attention to both the operational and the people aspects of the role. Our experience of working in the SME sector for nearly 20 years has highlighted the need for management to understand how to manage a team effectively. That’s the most challenging part of the role.

Our Management Effectiveness Programme doesn’t focus on the technical aspects of the role because that is very specific to each organisation, but the issues and challenges around managing people are common across all sectors and all industries. This is the area we zone in on and explore comprehensively with participants – building their confidence and competency in a range of management skills.

Here are 4 Key Questions for Managers in Managing People

1. Do you understand how to select the right talent for your team and for the organisation?

2. Do you know how to set expectations and measure results?
– do you regularly review expectations with feedback sessions with your employees?
– do you know how to measure performance effectively?
– how about annual performance appraisals with your team members?

3. How will you keep your team members motivated so that they want to keep coming in to work and continue to do the very best job they can?

4. Finally, when you have developed a great team, ask yourself how are you going to keep them in the organisation long-term? You need to keep them engaged and that requires further development. Have you a long-term development plan for your team?

 


Tricia Cunningham

 

 

 

 

Tricia Cunningham, senior partner at LEAP.
Click here for information about our management development programmes.

Contact us today to speak to a business advisor
Tel: 091 755736
E: info@leapleadership.ie

Interview with Des Kirby

In 3 signs you have an effective team, Tricia Cunningham focuses on results, communication and conflict resolution. Here she outlines why these requirements are so important for managers, not just for the immediate impact on the bottom line but also for the long-term stability and profitability of the business.

1 The Team Achieve Positive Results

The most obvious sign of effective management, and the one most people are eager to see, is results. However, it’s not just the positive results themselves that needs to be achieved but the process needs to be positive. Results need to be achieved in a way that can be maintained long term. If the process of achieving the positive results is too stressful and intense employees will burn out or leave – not a desired outcome.

2 Team Members Communicate Effectively

The second sign of effective management is clear communication between each team member within the group and with management. Core to this communication is clarity of role and responsibilities. People need to know what others are doing and where there needs to be a handover. Effective communication allows team members to understand what is happening within the team, what is likely to happen next and where support is needed. The manager drives this activity assisting the team in finding the optimum communication approaches and ensuring they are adhered to.

3 The Team Resolve Issues Without Resorting to Blame

Thirdly, when an issue arises, effective teams are able to resolve it without it becoming personal or resorting to blaming each other and falling out over it. Managers guide team members to analyse and solve problems systematically rather than by intuition or natural instinct. The focus becomes the issue and not the person. Language is monitored and labels are avoided.

No playing the blame game or finger pointing.

What if the team gets along well but their results are poor?
Every area of the business must have clearly identified targets they are expected to achieve and these targets need to be clearly communicated to all team members, tracked regularly and assessed for corrective action. If targets are not achieved, then something has to change. Managers may need to review targets to see how realistic they were in the first place; maybe they were never achievable based on the resources available.

However, if the targets have been properly assessed and found to be both valid and necessary but the team can’t reach them, then the team has to be held accountable. There needs to be a rigorous review of what prevented the team from succeeding. The manager needs to have that tough conversation with each team member who didn’t perform and with the collective team. Together they need to determine the corrective course of action and need to commit to sticking to that course of action. Once agreed, the manager needs to be rigorous in monitoring progress and address issues promptly.

By the same token, if the results are good in terms of the bottom line but morale within the team is poor, the manager must also address this issue. Fortunately, most team leaders and business owners understand that to sustain the business, you need a motivated workforce.

Low morale will eventually lead to poor results. Productivity will drop if morale is poor.

The other advantage of focusing on developing a strong, positive work culture is that it attracts stronger talent. A positive work environment is more likely to achieve positive results and attract positive, strong performers to the organisation. That’s a win for everyone.

 

Contact us today to speak to a business advisor
T: 091 755736
E: info@leapleadership.ie

We work mainly with business owners and managers in the SME sector and what we find in general is that they have a clear idea of what they want to achieve with their business, but what they don’t have are good methodologies in terms of implementing their vision for the business. One of the programmes we deliver is the futureSME and the management team programme. These programmes try to help business owners and senior management teams to deliver true leadership in the organisation. Any discussion about leadership effectiveness can be quite difficult to pin down. It’s about behaviour which is very hard to measure and values that can be difficult to articulate. At LEAP we have our own template that we go through with business owners. Here are 4 ways to increase leadership effectiveness.

1. Clarify the vision

The first thing we look at is the vision. We clarify what the leader’s vision for the company is by asking the question, ‘where do the leaders see the company going in the next two to three years?’ It’s about articulating that vision and finding a way to communicate that vision to the rest of the organisation.

2. Decide the purpose of the organisation

Once the vision has been established and clarified, we look at the core purpose of the organisation; what does the organisation represent and what do they want to achieve? I use the example of Ryanair distilling their message or purpose down to just two words – no frills. We try to help organisations to simplify their message and what it is they represent, so people in the organisation are clear about what behaviours and attitudes and standards are being set. That’s not just for the benefit of the staff but also to establish that sense of purpose for customers and suppliers as well.

3. Establish goals

Once we establish that purpose we look at the three or four primary goals that the organisation wants to achieve. Then we find a mechanism to articulate those goals particularly through visual management systems. One of the visual tools we use are Gantt Charts featuring various lines of action, where we assign work to people, in other words who is going to do what and when. It’s essentially a visual monitoring system , like a traffic light system to show what’s working and what isn’t. Green means the action is on target, orange means the action has been delayed or is still in progress and red is for tasks that have missed their completion date.

4. Measure performance

Another thing we try to establish is what the correct key performance indicators (KPI) are in the business. KPIs show the activities of team members and the level of progress in different areas within the business. One of the things I find working with companies is that they either have no KPIs at all, or they are measuring some KPIs but they are the wrong ones. The KPIs they are measuring are driving the wrong behaviours and activities within the organisation. That can greatly hinder a company’s performance and needs to be corrected as a matter of urgency.

So it’s very important that everything is aligned from the leader’s vision to the purpose of the company through to the goals, lines of action and KPIs. You can talk about leadership styles and the different types of leaders, but if you follow this clear methodology you can’t go far wrong.

 

leadership, leadership ireland, executive coach John Raftery is Senior Partner and Executive Coach at LEAP

 

Executive coaching programmes can benefit business leaders of all kinds whether you run a small, medium or large company. An executive coach can offer a business owner or senior manager an objective view of their performance as team leaders as well as offering fresh perspectives on their vision for the business and where it is going. Executive coaches don’t tell business leaders how to run their companies but they do give them open and honest feedback that they can use to their advantage to improve both their individual performance and the overall performance of the business. Executive coach John Raftery outlines 3 reasons why you need executive coaching and the role it plays in effective leadership development that benefits the whole organisation.

1. Executive coach as a sounding board

The first reason it works is because to a large extent business leaders don’t get an opportunity to talk in a confidential and safe environment. The key thing is that they can use the executive coach as a sounding board. Just trying to articulate their own ideas can be a challenge for business leaders. To a large extent business leaders live inside their own heads. Then they try to communicate with their staff and it can be difficult for staff to interpret what’s in the leader’s head. Communicating ideas to staff can be challenging. They may be cautious about articulating certain issues or concerns that they might have. So the first thing executive coaching does is it gives people the ability to try and articulate what is going on inside their own heads.

2. Provide feedback

The second thing an executive coach does is provide feedback, and ask challenging questions of the leader as well. It’s important that the executive coach has experience, has some knowledge or background in business so they have credibility with the leader in terms of giving feedback and acting as a sounding board.

3. Inspire action

The third thing an executive coach can do is inspire people to take action or prevent procrastination. A lot of leaders have particular issues that they know they need to address. But as long as it stays in their head they will never get around to actually dealing with it. But an executive coach will listen to you and challenge you and encourage you to take action. To start implementing a plan of action and set deadlines to deal with issues, and be confident that once you deal with those issues you can give further feedback to the coach. You then use that feedback to see how things have gone and decide where to go next.

It’s important to point out that executive coaching is non-directional. It’s a process that allows the business leader to make up their minds and come to their own conclusions. You’re suggesting ways forward, you’re asking the leader ‘what if’ or what are the alternatives. Is there another way of looking at this or how do they feel about approaching a problem in another way? What do they think the outcome would be if they tried an alternative solution? You are not saying to the leader ‘this is what you should do.’ You can offer advice and guide people in a certain direction but ultimately the business decision rests with them, they must come to their own conclusions. So really executive coaching is about providing the space for business leaders to explore options they may not have otherwise considered and then letting them come to their own conclusions. That way they take ownership of their decisions rather than passing responsibility to someone else. They own the decision and if they own it they are far more likely to follow through and implement it.

John Raftery is Executive Coach at LEAP

John Raftery

 

 

 

 

 

 

The vast majority of people in management, bar military people that sign up to it, land in management roles because of their expertise in the area they work in. There is no evidence that they are predisposed to becoming an effective manager. For example, a finance person may become a financial director because they have a background in finance, they have their accountancy qualification, they’re good with numbers but there’s no evidence that they can manage a team of people.

So why do they get the promotions?
It’s based on their technical competence and they are good hard workers. They understand their brief so they seem like a safe pair of hands. Most people are not hired for management roles; most people acquire management responsibilities the more they prove themselves in their particular area of expertise. Because they are good foot soldiers, they are then given management responsibilities on the back of that. There is often little or no evaluation done by the company or the individual regarding their suitability to manage. They are getting managerial responsibility because of their ability to manage their own area of expertise.

What is meant by management capability?
It means having the skill set, the confidence and the awareness to be able to manage yourself, and manage the team you work with to ensure the company achieves the right outcomes. For example, the good salesperson who ends up becoming a sales manager. They are naturally good at hunting down potential customers and opportunities, and going down every avenue to make that sale. But when they become managers their natural hunting abilities are not required. They are now required to help people on the team who may have less experience and less ability than themselves. They must support them and coach them, but they are naturally more inclined to think in terms of sales and ‘going in for the kill.’ That hunting mind-set is poorly suited to the mind-set of supporting, mentoring and coaching teams who are not at the same level as you are.

So they are out of sync with the capability level of the team, but the company who chose them are basing their decision on the last five years of sales which were good so we’re making you sales manager. There is no thought given to the question of what skill set is needed to effectively manage a team. The person may have the mind-set of a sales ‘warrior’ but is that the correct mind-set for helping individual team members to become effective in their roles, and supporting them throughout their development? People can flounder and get very frustrated, and the company can get very frustrated with their lack of performance but that’s because they are a square peg in a round hole. People must take responsibility. The buck stops with the person who appoints people to management roles without proper evaluation of their management capabilities.

What should happen before someone is appointed to a management position?
The first thing is to clearly define the objectives of the role. Then decide how you are going to measure if someone is doing a good job or not. Identify what behaviours come naturally to them, then outline the key behaviours that you need to see someone demonstrate in the role. Are they good at dealing with people on a one-to-one basis? Are they good at confronting them when they are performing poorly, or their behaviour becomes unacceptable?

So it’s about people management skills and the behaviour of managers in keeping with the values that are critical to the organisation. Has the potential candidate demonstrated the wherewithal to support those values through their behaviour? Have they got the flexibility, the adaptability and the decision-making capability to align with company values and fit the managerial role? Their values and behaviours as managers will in turn effect the organisation as a whole.

The new manager needs to develop a new mind set

What happens when business owners or senior managers choose the wrong person for a managerial role?
Well it’s very stressful for all concerned. It’s stressful for the individual who has been dumped into a management position. They are trying to prove themselves to the company and they sometimes behave in a reactionary way towards team members who are not performing well. They don’t respond in a healthy way; they don’t give people the space or time or proper support they need to improve. As manager you need to find ways to effectively engage your team members, and not just keep banging on the table because you feel under pressure to prove yourself. Becoming a manager is often an ‘accident’ imposed on an individual who is ill prepared for the role, selected by senior staff who have not gone through a proper evaluation process. So it ends up becoming a very stressful situation all round.

But if someone is already in the role and they are clearly not a good fit, what should happen then?
Well usually it’s a case of the manager not fitting well as opposed to being the wrong fit entirely. The person has an understanding of what needs to be delivered in terms of the business; the challenge is how to get the team to do it as opposed to doing it themselves. Nobody told me I was going to be a manager but you are a manager now, and you have to step up to the plate. First you must increase your self-awareness and how you communicate with the people around you. In the past you focused on being right, but now as manager you have to focus on getting the right outcome for the company. You can no longer be happy to be right all the time; you must now focus on getting a team of people to achieve consistently good results. The emphasis is now on the team’s performance not on you as an individual.

So the new manager needs to develop a new mind-set.
Absolutely, and of course you can acquire new skills and knowledge. You can work on communication skills or time management or conflict management, but it’s crucial to adapt the new mind-set first. You have to be clear that you are no longer here to show how good you are at sales but to lead a team. You have to think, I am here to get the most from my team and get the best outcome for the company.

The more effectively you can change your mind-set and adapt to a new way of doing things in your work environment, the better chance you have at being successful as a manager. And it’s ok to make mistakes and get some things wrong if it’s within the context of your new role as manager. You test objectives and find that some worked and others didn’t, and you take time to reflect on those outcomes and understand why they did or didn’t work. Through that process you are acquiring the new skills necessary to be an effective manager.

 

Mike Gaffney managing director at LEAPMike Gaffney is managing director at LEAP.